Skip to main content

Full text of "Catalogue 1924-1925"

See other formats




•?•;, 
^'>. 
















yt.'> -I 



•V" t. yC 






,/. •' rf 






;jivv 



^y.' 






%^K.^2' '^ 



^•.:'- i - 



:t-.v 

















.r-'T 












.^•0^- 




y^' : 











.^.t>" 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 



CATALOGUE 
1924-1925 




Conservatory Department Building 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 



JOHN GROLLE 

DIRECTOR 



UNDER THE AUSPICES OF 

THE CURTIS FOUNDATION 

created by 

Mary Louise Curtis Bok 



RITTENHOUSE SQUARE 
PHILADELPHIA • PENNSYLVANIA 



TRUSTEES 

Mrs. Edward W. Bok 
W. Curtis Bok 
Philip S. Collins 
Cyrus H. K. Curtis 
Mrs. Samuel S. Pels 

. ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Pelix Adler Josef Hofmann 

Edward W. Bok Willem Mengelberg 

Cyrus H. K. Curtis Mme. Marcella Sembrich 

Walter Pischer Leopold Stokowski 

Carl Plesch Ernest Urchs 

Ossip Gabrilowitsch Edward Zeigler 

EXECUTIVE STAFF 

John Grolle, Director 
Grace H. Spofford, Executive Secretary 

Emily L. McCallip 
Registrar of the Preparatory Department 



THE FACULTY 
CONSERVATORY DEPARTMENT 



Piano 
Berthe Bert Josef Hofmann 

George F. Boyle David Saperton 

Austin Conradi Isabella Vengerova 

Voice 
Perley Dunn Aldrich Horatio Connell 
Madame Charles Cahier Madame Marcella Sembrich 
Mrs, Wood Stewart 

Oratorio and Repertoire 
Nicholas Douty 

Opera 
Andreas Dippel 

Choral Training and Church Music 
(Instructor to be announced) 

Violin 
Carl Flesch Sacha Jacobinoff 

Frank Gittelson Michael Press 

Emanuel Zetlin 



Viola 
Louis Svecexski 

Violoncello 
Horace Britt Michel Penha 

Harp 
(Instructor to be announced) 

Ensemble 
Horace Britt Louis Svecenski 

Orchestra 
Michael Press Leopold Stokowski 



COURSES IN MUSICIANSHIP 

Rhythmic Training and Elements of Music 
Under the direction of Angela Diller 

Harmony and Ear Training 
Under the direction of George A. Wedge 

Analysis, Form and Aesthetics 
Rosario Scalero 

Counterpoint, Composition and Instrumentation 
Rosario Scalero 



ACADEMIC COURSES 



English 
(Lecturer to be announced) 

Italian 

DOMENICO VlTTORINI, A.M., Litt.D. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, 
University of Pennsylvania 

French 
Jean B. Beck, Ph.D. 

Professor of Romance Languages, University of Pennsylvania 



German 
Herman J. Weigand, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of German, University of Pennsylvania 



The list of faculty includes all those appointed previous 
to the publication of this catalogue. The names of addi- 
tional members, as well as instructors in Literature, Prin- 
ciples of Psychology, Philosophy, the Interrelationship of 
the Arts, and various other academic courses, will be 
announced later. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

Piano 
Mrs. George F. Boyle Arthur E. Hice 

Esther Cinberg M. Leah Kirshner 

Clara Dunn Marjorie Paddock 

Isadore Freed Dorothy D. Strait 

Ruth Shufro Strauss 

Violin 
Joel Belov David Cohen 

Horace Brown Lotta Greenup 

Lillian Cinberg Maurice Kaplan 

Alfred Seyden 

Violoncello 
(Instructors to be announced) 

Ensemble 
Under the direction of Louis Svecenski 

Orchestra 
Isadore Freed 

Chorus 
(Instructor to be announced) 

MUSICIANSHIP 

Rhythmic Training and Elements of Music 

Under the direction of Angela Diller 

Instructor 

Ethel S. Drummond 

Ear Training and Harmony 
Under the direction of George A. Wedge 

Instructors 
Isadore Freed W. Beatrice Haines Else West Rulon 



CALENDAR 
1924-1925 

Enrollment Conferences for Preparatory Depart- 
ment September 15-20 

Entrance Examinations for Conservatory Depart- 
ment September 22-27 

First Term Begins October 1 

Second Term Begins February 2 

Second Term Ends May 30 

Commencement June 4 



HOLIDAYS 

Thanksgiving Thursday, November 27 

Christmas Vacation December 24-January 2 

Washington's Birthday February 22 

Easter Vacation Wednesday before Easter 

to Thursday after Easter, 
inclusive 



10 



FOREWORD 

cy^HE Curtis Institute of Music has been estab- 
^ lished to maintain in Philadelphia a school of 
music which equals in all respects the leading con- 
servatories of Europe and America. The Curtis 
Foundation, created by Mary Louise Curtis Bok, 
enables the Institute to offer its pupils practical 
musical instruction leading to a broad and compre- 
hensive conception of music as an art. 



Principles of the Institute 

To offer courses of study which provide all the 
necessary elements for the development of artists, 
teachers, or non-professional students of music: 

To employ as teachers, artists who combine 
pedagogic qualities w^ith practical musicianship. 
The faculty includes artists who are actually on the 
concert platform today, and who have international 
as well as national reputation as teachers and 
soloists : 

To foster the student's sense of discrimination 
through opportunities which the private teacher is 
usually unable to give; these advantages include 
recitals and lectures, personal contact with leading 
artists, and courses in such cultural subjects as are 
essential for a thorough musical education: 

To stimulate the student's creative faculties by 
maintaining an environment conducive to personal 
response and serious study. 

11 



The The Director is an experienced musician, 

Director ^^^^^er and executive. Under his personal super- 
vision, pupils are assigned to the teachers best suited 
to their needs. In co-operation with a Faculty 
Council, he directs the work of each student in 
order to secure maximum progress. 



pundamental ^]\Qeds of ^jj^usic Students 

Music students require thorough training in 
certain fundamental elements of music to develop 
the comprehensive understanding upon which true 
musicianship is based. 

The training includes instruction in rhythm to 
perfect muscular control and to stimulate mental 
alertness. Equally important is the development of 
the imagination through aesthetic expression, and 
melodic conception and memory through training of 
the ear. The student should have an understanding 
of harmony and musical analysis, as well as the 
ability to read music at sight. Courses in general 
cultural subjects are also essential to give the pupil 
a background for continued study and to develop 
personality. 

These fundamental needs are definitely recog- 
nized in the courses offered at the Institute, and the 
entire curriculum is planned to develop the breadth 
of vision and the profound love of art which char- 
acterize the true and sincere artist. 

12 



T^lan of Instruction 

The Institute is divided into two departments, 
the Conservatory and the Preparatory. The Con- 
servatory Department will accept students suffi- 
ciently advanced to meet its requirements, while 
the Preparatory Department will accept beginners 
and less advanced students. 

Students enrolling in either department will be 
assigned to teachers by the Director, according to 
the development and needs of the student. Requests 
for assignment to specified teachers will be given 
careful consideration, but the Director reserves the 
right to make such assignments as seem in his 
judgment to be for the best interests of the 
students. 



Assignment of 
Students 



13 



CONSERVATORY DEPARTMENT 
Piano 
/f STUDY of the average accomplishment of 
piano students tends to show a need for 
teaching the essential factors upon which piano 
playing as an art is based — namely, ear training, 
rhythmic training, aural and keyboard harmony, 
sight reading, repertoire (technical as well as 
solo) and the elements of music. The Institute 
believes that only through a thorough knowledge 
of these fundamentals can true musicianship as well 
as technical proficiency be developed. For those 
planning to teach music, a familiarity with peda- 
gogy and the elements of psychology, and practical 
experience in the use of teaching material is essen- 
tial, in addition to the subjects mentioned above. 
The courses of the Institute, therefore, have been 
arranged to give each student this fundamental 
training. 

Courses of Piano 

T . One hour lesson weekly. 

Instruction 

Musicianship 

Approximately six hours of instruction 

weekly. 

1. Ear Training. 

2. Aural and Keyboard Harmony, Counter- 

point, Improvisation, Composition. 

3. Elements of Music, Analysis, Form and 

Aesthetics. 

14 



4. Study of Repertoire — To insure corj^ct 

principles for self-development and teach- 
ing through familiarity with a sufficient 
number of classic and modern compo- 
sitions. 

5. Ensemble playing. 

6. Practical experience in teaching in one of 

the Preparatory Centers of the Institute 

for those who desire to receive the 

Teacher's Certificate. 

In addition to the musical instruction, the course 

in piano includes the study of Musical History, the 

Principles of Psychology and Philosophy, as well as 

two additional academic courses. A satisfactory 

paper on these elective subjects is required for 

graduation. 

Voice 
In general, vocalists do not have an opportunity 
of receiving adequate rhythmic training, ear train- 
ing, and instruction in the fundamentals of aural 
and keyboard harmony or piano playing. Other 
elementary needs are the study of diction, languages 
and concert repertoire. Students should also be 
familiar with church music, oratorio or opera. 

The courses in singing have been planned to 
give the students this indispensable training as well 
as a comprehensive cultural background. 
Vocal Instruction 

Two half -hour lessons weekly. 
Musicianship 

Approximately six hours of instruction 
weekly. 



(bourses of 
Instruction 



15 



1. Rhythmic Training, Ear Training and 

Theory. 

2. Piano (if not previously studied). 

3. Elements of Music, Analysis and Form. 

4. Ensemble Singing. 

5. Repertoire and Coaching. 

6. Languages, Study of Diction. 

7. Opera, including a thorough training in 

stage deportment. Oratorio, or Church 
Music (according to the purpose for 
which the student is training). 

Vocal students will be required to study the 
History of Music. They are also required to attend 
such lectures in the Academic Courses as the 
Director and instructors consider necessary. 

Oratorio and Repertoire 

The instruction in these subjects is based upon 
the historic development of the oratorio and of vocal 
repertoire, and includes analysis, phrasing, rhythmic 
design and thorough understanding of accompani- 
ments. In addition, students should become familiar 
with the poetic or religious message of the works 
studied. 

Opera 

The course is planned to familiarize the stu- 
dents not only with the music of the most impor- 
tant operas, but also with the dramatic action. 
Thus singing and acting will become a natural and 
artistic interpretation of the composer's thought. 

16 



The course will include the study of stage deport- 
ment, repertoire, and a thorough analysis of the 
operatic scores. 

Choral Singing and Church Music 

Students desiring to become church singers 
should have extensive training in a capella singing 
as well as familiarity with the smaller works for 
church choirs by the classic and modern composers. 
The choral singing courses of the Institute are 
arranged to acquaint the vocal students with the 
principal works of church music, and to givt prac- 
tical training in the technic of chorus singing. 

Stringed Instruments 

Players of stringed instruments have many fun- 
damental needs besides their regular instrumental 
instruction. Ear training, rhythmic training, aural 
and keyboard harmony, followed by counterpoint 
and composition, should be supplemented with 
ensemble and orchestra playing. A knowledge of 
the principal compositions for their respective 
instruments is essential to make them intelligent 
musicians, as is also sufficient instruction on the 
piano to play accompaniments. 

Furthermore, those who enter the profession 
as teachers need instruction in pedagog}^ and the 
elements of psychology, as well as practical teaching 
experience. 

The following advanced courses are offered to 
the students of stringed instruments: 

17 



(bourses of 
Instruction 



Instrumental Instruction 
One hour lesson weekly. 
Musicianship 

Approximately six hours of instruction 
weekly. 

1. Ear Training. 

2. Aural and Keyboard Harmony, Counter- 

point, Improvisation, Composition. 

3. Elements of Music, Analysis, Form and 

Aesthetics. 

4. Piano. 

5. Study of Repertoire — To insure correct 

principles of self-development and teach- 
ing through familiarity with a sufficient 
number of classic and modern composi- 
tions. 

6. Ensemble and Orchestra Playing. 

7. Practical experience in teaching in one of 

the Preparatory Centers of the Institute 

for those who desire to receive the 

Teacher's Certificate. 

In addition to the musical instruction, these 

courses also include the study of Musical History, 

the Principles of Psychology and Philosophy, as well 

as two additional academic courses. A satisfactory 

paper on these elective subjects is required for 

graduation. 

Ensemble 
The instruction is planned to develop the 
student's understanding and consequent playing of 
the master works of the classic, romantic and 
modern schools. 

18 



Orchestra 

Instruction is offered in the playing of all 
orchestral instruments. The Institute has engaged 
as teachers of this department, soloists of the 
various choirs of the Philadelphia Orchestra: 
W. M. Kincaid, Flute; Marcel Tabuteau, Oboe; 
Anton Horner, Horn; and others. The orchestra 
training will be under the direction of Leopold 
Stokowski, conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, 
and Michael Press, until recently conductor of 
Symphony Orchestras in Russia and Sweden. 

Students will receive thorough training in 
rhythmic phrasing, orchestra technic, tone produc- 
tion and the development of detail. They will also 
be taught to discriminate between the style and the 
essential characteristics of the master works to be 
performed. 

Applied Pedagogy 

Students of the Institute who are preparing for 
a Teacher's Certificate have the opportunity of 
teaching under expert supervision in one of The 
Curtis Institute Preparatory Centers. This not 
only gives them valuable practical experience in 
applying the theories of pedagog}', but also develops 
one of the essential factors of successful teaching — 
the ability to make personal and social contacts. 



19 



History of Music 



Period 
of the 
Middle 
Ages 



I. Development of the Church tonal- 
ities from the old Greek music 
system. 

II. Beginning of polyphonic music. 

III. The flowering of the true counter- 
point. 



Modern 
Period 



I. The age of musical reforms. 

II. The period of the classics. 

III. Modern Music (Romanticism, the 
growth of subjectiveness, the ten- 
dency toward descriptive music). 



Recitals and Lectures 

Recitals and lectures will be given frequently 
throughout the year by members of the faculty and 
special lecturers. At these recitals an intimate and 
informal atmosphere will be maintained. Recitals 
by students in the Conservatory and Preparatory 
Departments will be held at stated times during 
the year. 



20 



ACADEMIC COURSES 

/T^ art is one of the essential needs for creative 
living, the cultural development of music 
students should aim to give them an understanding 
and appreciation of the interrelationship of the 
various arts and sciences. Chief among these con- 
tributions to man's spiritual life are the fine arts, 
literature, science, philosophy, and psychological 
research. 

The aim of the Academic Courses of the 
Institute is to acquaint the students with the funda- 
mental unity underlying the various art forms and 
related sciences, in order to develop the students' 
sense of responsibility toward art and life, and to 
give them a higher conception of personal and 
professional ethics. 

Courses will be given in Languages, Literature, 
the Principles of Psychology and Philosophy, and 
the Interrelationship of the Arts. 

Students are required to study at least two 
academic subjects each term and attend lectures as- 
signed to them. A paper based on these elective 
subjects is required for graduation. 



21 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

CT^ EGINNERS and less advanced students who 
"^-^ are sincerely interested in their work and 
who possess natural aptitude for music are eligible 
for admission to the Preparatory Department. 
These requirements are made to prevent useless 
expenditure of time and money on the part of the 
pupil which so often occurs when students study 
music without due consideration. 

After a personal conference with the Director 
or the Executive Secretary, candidates for this 
Department will be placed in the courses for which 
their previous training has fitted them. Conferences 
will be held during the week of September 15-22. 

The courses of the Preparatory Department are 
planned to prepare the students, including beginners, 
for the advanced and master classes of the Institute. 
Complete co-ordination between the instrumental 
and the theoretical instruction will be maintained. 

Courses of Piaxo 

J ^ . Two half-hour lessons weekly. 

Instruction 

Musicianship 

Approximately two hours of instruction 
weekly. Elements of Music, Rhythmic Train- 
ing, Ear Training, Theory, Ensemble, Sight 
Reading, Music History, Class Discussions. 

Violin 

Two half-hour lessons weekly. 

22 




Preparatory Department Building 



Musicianship 

Approximately two hours of instruction 
weekly. Elements of Music, Rhythmic Train- 
ing, Ear Training, Theory, Ensemble, Sight 
Reading, Music History, Orchestra Practice, 
Class Discussions. 

Viola 

Two half-hour lessons weekly. 

Musicianship 

Approximately two hours of instruction 
weekly. Elements of Music, Rhythmic Train- 
ing, Ear Training, Theory, Ensemble, Sight 
Reading, Music History, Orchestra Practice, 
Class Discussions. 

Violoncello 

Two half -hour lessons weekly. 

Musicianship 

Approximately two hours of instruction 
weekly. Elements of Music, Rhythmic Train- 
ing, Ear Training, Theory, Ensemble, Sight 
Reading, Music History, Orchestra Practice, 
Class Discussions. 

Ensemble 

Duet Playing, Chamber Music Playing, 
Chorus Singing. 

Orchestra 

Technic of Orchestra Playing, Development 
of Ear, Phrasing, Dynamics, Study of Or- 
chestra Repertoire. 

23 



^J^quirements 

for 
graduation 



Students must show by their progress and gen- 
eral musicianship that they are eligible to enter the 
Conservatory Department of the Institute. To this 
end, they are required to pass the entrance exami- 
nations of the Conservatory Department. 

Students graduating from the Preparatory 
Department will receive a Certificate of Gradua- 
tion from the Department. 

The time required to complete the courses of 
the Preparatory Department depends entirely upon 
the individual effort and ability of the student. 



Special 
Students 



Teachers' 
^J^ormal 

Pours es 

For T^arents 
and <iy^usic 
T*atrons 



SPECIAL COURSES 
A limited number of special students in the 
vocal and instrumental courses will be admitted 
each year. These students, enrolling for special 
subjects only, are charged the studio rate of the 
teacher to whom they are assigned. 

Teachers' Normal Courses — instrumental as 
well as theoretical — will be given for students and 
teachers not connected with the Institute. 

Parents and patrons of music are invited to 
attend lectures on the Appreciation of Music and 
the Elements of Music. Terms may be obtained 
upon application to the Secretary. 



REGISTRATION 

Students for either department may be regis- 
tered at any time before September 27th. 



24 



ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS FOR THE 
CONSERVATORY DEPARTMENT 

All candidates for admission to the Conservatory 
Department will be expected to pass an entrance 
examination. These examinations will be held dur- 
ing the week of September 22-27. 

A fee of ten dollars, payable before the exami- 
nation, will be required of all candidates. If the 
examination results in enrollment, the fee will be 
credited on the first tuition payment. 

Candidates must be able to play satisfactorily ^jano 
from memory all major and minor scales and 
arpeggios ; selected studies from Czerny, Opus 740 ; 
Bach Three-Part Inventions; a movement of a 
Beethoven Sonata, or a composition of equal difficulty. 

Any student will be accepted who has a good Uoice 
voice, a correct ear and a natural sense of rhythm. 

Candidates must be able to play satisfactorily Uiolin 
all major and minor scales, and arpeggios in three 
and four octaves. They should also have sufficient 
training in double stop playing, and the ability 
to play the Kreutzer Exercises and one of the 
following concertos from memory: Spohr No. 2, 
De Beriot No. 2, Kreutzer No. 19, Viotti No. 22, 
Rode No. 7, Theme and Variations by J. Tartini, 
or a composition of equal difficulty. 

Candidates must be able to play satisfactorily Uioloncello 
from memory all major and minor scales, arpeggios, 
and a concerto by Golterman, Romberger, Klengel, 
or some other composition of equal difficulty. 



25 



cy^fCusicianship ^^^ students will be examined in general 

musicianship (Ear Training, Theory, Rhythmic 
Training) and will be graded according to their 
previous instruction. 

These are minimum requirements. Students 
offering more advanced work will be given full 
credit and be rated according to their proficiency. 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS 

Conservatory Department 

A Certificate will be granted to students who 
have satisfactorily completed the full courses of 
study in their respective branches. No time limit 
can be set for the completion of any course as 
the time needed is dependent upon the student's 
individual effort and ability, but, in general, the 
full course may be completed in three or four years. 

A Diploma is given to students who have 
received the Certificate of Graduation and who 
have completed two years of post-graduate work. 

A Teacher's Certificate will be given to those 
students who have successfully completed the regular 
course in the Conservatory Department and addi- 
tional work in practical and theoretical pedagogy. 

FEES 

Tuition, payable strictly in advance, is due in 
two installments — the first on October 1st, the 
second on February 2nd. 

Students will be enrolled only for the entire 
year. 

26 



Students admitted after the opening of the 
school term will be charged for the time during 
which they are students at the Institute. 

No refund will be made for students leaving 
before the expiration of the school year. Excep- 
tional cases will receive the consideration of the 
Director. 

No deduction will be made for loss of lessons, 
except in case of protracted illness of more than 
five weeks. In this case, a rebate of one-half the 
fee for the time lost will be credited on the next 
term's tuition, if the student returns to the Institute 
within the current year. 

Tuition covers instruction in all courses of 
study required by the various departments, and 
attendance at all lectures and concerts given at the 
Institute. 

Enrollment in the Institute will be considered 
as tacit acceptance of all conditions stated in the 
catalogue. 

CONSERVATORY DEPARTMENT 
FULL COURSES 
Total 

Piano $300 

Stringed Instruments .... 300 

Voice 350 

Orchestral Instruments — Terms upon request. 
SPECIAL COURSES 
Total 

Theory $100 

One Language Course ... 30 
Teachers' Normal Course. 100 60 40 

Additional Courses — Terms upon request. 
27 



First 
Pavment 

$175 


Second 
Payment 

$125 


175 


125 


200 


150 


on request. 


First 
Payment 

$60 


Second 
Pavment 

$40 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 
FULL COURSES 

First Second 

Total Pavment Payment 

Piano $175 $100 $75 

Stringed Instruments .... 175 100 75 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Free One scholarship, entitling the student to free 

Scholarships t^^^^^n, will be given in each branch of study 
offered by the Institute. These scholarships will 
be awarded to students of exceptional talent and 
unusual general ability who are in need of such 
assistance. 

Additional information may be obtained upon 
application to the Secretary. 



28 



REGULATIONS AND GENERAL 
INFORMATION 

CT^O insure progress satisfactory to the Institute, 
-^ the parents, and the pupils themselves, the 
Institute makes certain reasonable demands of its 
students. Regular and punctual class attendance, 
careful preparation of lessons, attendance at demon- 
stration recitals by students and faculty, and 
co-operation with the requirements of the Institute, 
will be expected at all times. 

In case of absence for any cause whatsoever, 
notice should be sent or given immediately to the 
Secretary's office. 

All courses at the Institute will be arranged to 
insure the students the maximum time for practice. 

Students may be excused from any of the courses 
in either Department upon presenting satisfactory 
proof of previous study. 

Instrumental instruction will be given indi- 
vidually; theoretical and academic courses in classes. 

A report of the student's attendance and prog- 
ress will be presented at the end of each school 
term. 

Students in the Conservatory Department will 
be expected to pass an examination in their prin- 
cipal studies at the end of each school term. 



Two examinations a term will be 
students in the Preparatory Department. 



given to 



'^epor 



ts 



Undergraduate 
Bjxaminations 



29 



Summer 
School 



Students failing to pass a satisfactory exami- 
nation in a subject will be permitted to repeat the 
subject. 

Students whose work is not satisfactory, either 
through lack of effort or ability, cannot be con- 
tinued as students of the Institute. 

Information concerning The Institute Summer 
School may be obtained on application to the 
Secretary. 

Buildings and Equipment 

The Conservatory Department occupies its own 
building on the southeast corner of Eighteenth 
and Locust Streets, facing Rittenhouse Square, one 
of Philadelphia's delightful residential sections. It 
is convenient to train service as well as to the busi- 
ness and cultural centers of the city. 

The atmosphere of the building is quiet and 
dignified. The rooms, well furnished and airy, con- 
sist of individual studios, a concert room with stage, 
practice rooms, reception rooms for pupils and visi- 
tors, and a reference library. 

The studios are equipped with Steinway pianos. 

The Preparatory Department occupies a sep- 
arate building at 1720 Locust Street. It, too, has 
its practice rooms, studios, reception rooms for 
pupils and visitors, and is equipped with Steinway 
pianos. 

As yet. The Curtis Institute has no dormitories, 
and can assume no responsibility except for the 
instruction of pupils. 



30 



PHILADELPHIA AS AN EDUCATIONAL 
CENTER 

CT)HILADELPHIA offers many advantages to 
the student of music. Its permanent sym- 
phony orchestra gives, each season, fifty-eight per- 
formances and additional special concerts, the 
repertoire comprising the best of the classics and 
many works of present-day composers of all countries 
and schools. Concerts are given by orchestras from 
other cities, as well as by European orchestras visit- 
ing this country. The Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany gives eighteen performances during the season, 
and there are ample opportunities for hearing other 
operatic companies, chamber music and solo recitals. 

Several large libraries may be used without 
charge by students. These institutions own many 
valuable and rare musical scores, as well as large 
collections of music, and books relating to music and 
the allied arts. There are two museums in which 
the cultural and artistic achievements in every line 
of human endeavor may be studied. There are also 
two Universities, the Academy of Fine Arts, and 
the Wilstach, Johnson and Widener art collections, 
all of which play an important part in the cultural 
atmosphere of the city. 

Philadelphia is sufficiently near New York to 
enable students to go to that city at a reasonable 
cost of time and money to hear such musical events 
as are not given in Philadelphia. It is also close 
to Washington, which houses the musical branch of 

31 



the Library of Congress, where musical scores 
obtainable nowhere else in the country may be 
studied bv the most advanced students. 



32 



INDEX 

Advisory Council 5 

Buildings and Equipment 30 

Calendar 10 

Certificates and Diplomas — Conservatory Department 26 
Description of Courses: 

Conservatory Department 14-20 

Preparatory Department 22-23 

Academic Courses 21 

Special Courses 24 

Director 12 

Entrance Requirements: 

Conservatory Department 25 

Preparatory Department 22 

Executive Staff 5 

Faculty Members: 

Conservatory Department 6-8 

Preparatory Department 9 

Foreword 11 

Fundamental Needs of Music Students 12 

Graduation Requirements for Preparatory Department 24 

Philadelphia as an Educational Center 31-32 

Plan of Instruction 13 

Principles of the Institute 11 

Recitals and Lectures 20 

Registration 24 

Regulations and General Information 29 

Scholarships 28 

Summer School 30 

Teachers' Normal Courses 24 

Trustees 5 

Tuition Fees 27 

Undergraduate Examinations 29 



ATBS COMPAWY 



LAOELPHIA 



THE CURTIS INSTITUTE 
OF MUSIC 

PHILADELPHIA 



w|5M 


V 


WM 


f 


W^m^ 




[^''='="^i=-^ 



^xil^ 


^J 


ff^T^ 



^mim^ 






I:']: I 



The Curtis Institute 
of Music 

Endowed 

By MARY LOUISE CURTIS BOK 




RITTENHOUSE SQUARE 
PHILADELPHIA : PENNSYLVANIA 



The Curtis Institute of Music 

WAS CREATED, IN 1924, 
UNDER AN ENDOWMENT 

By Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

AND is operated UNDER A CHARTER OF 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Ojficers 

of 
The Curtis Institute of Music 

President 
Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

Vice President 
Philip S. Collins 

Secretary and Treasurer 
WiLLL\M Curtis Bok 

Board of Directors 

Mrs. Mary Louise Curtis Bok 

WiLLL^M Curtis Bok 

Philip S. Collins 
Cyrus H. K. Curtis 
Mrs. Samuel S. Fels 

Advisory Council 

Felix Adler Josef Hofmann 

Edward W. Bok Willem Mengelberg 

Cyrus H. K. Curtis Mme. Marcella Sembrich 

Walter Fischer Leopold Stokowski 

Carl Flesch Ernest Urchs 

Ossip Gabrilowitsch Edward Zeigler 



three 



The Executive Staff 

of 
The Curtis Institute of Music 

Grace H. Spofford Executive Secretary 

Lawrence Adler 
Adviser of The Academic Department 

Emily L. McCallip 
Registrar of The Preparatory Department 

The Address of The Institute 

Rittenhouse Square 
philadelphia pennsylvania 



four 



'-\ 



W i 






%k ©irtlsinstitute orjBusic 

Founded by Alary Louise Curtis J3oK 

A Statement by the Founder : 

It is my aim that earnest students shall acquire a 
thorough musical education, not learning only to sing or 
play, but also the history of music, the laws of its making, 
languages, ear'training and music appreciation. 

They shall learn to think and to express their thoughts 
against a background of quiet culture, with the stimulus 
of personal contact with artist-teachers who represent the 
highest and finest in their art. 

The aim is for quality of the work rather than quick, 
showy results. 



HN:! 







Decoration by 
Will H. Howell and Associates 



fM'H i- --:; 




-t' Mpn 







Drawing by Ruyl 



Entrance Hall of 
The Conservatory Department Building 



Two of the most beautiful residences in Philadelphia 
were erected by Mr. George W. Childs Drexel, of the 
family of the banking house of Drexel and Company, and 
by Mr. Theodore F. Cramp, of the family of the Cramp 
shipyards. 

One of these homes faces the carefuUygardened 
Rittenhouse Square, the centre of the choicest residential 
section of the city, the other is adjacent to it. 

These two private mansions embodied in a pecuhar 
sense, the beauty, the elegance and the homelike quality 
which it was the desire of the founder of The Curtis 
Institute of Music that the new institution should possess. 
Accordingly, they were purchased, together with a third 
adjoining house, and renovated, and are now the home 
of the Institute, the Preparatory Department, the Con' 
servatory Department and the Executive Department 
each occupying its individual residence. 

The location of the houses is also most desirable. 
In a neighborhood of residential quiet, it is nevertheless 
only four squares from the heart of the city where occur, 
during each season, the eighteen performances of grand 
opera by The MetropoHtan Opera Company of New York, 
the more than seventy symphonic concerts by The Phila' 
delphia Orchestra, and the continuous succession of mus' 
ical, literary and dramatic events, by the foremost artists 
of the world, which Philadelphia annually presents. 



five 



The Purpose of The Institute 

The distinctive quality of The Curtis Institute of 
Music Hes in the belief of the founder that while music 
may be taught in all its branches by masters of the art, 
the student who would have received only this instruction 
would be ill equipped to stand before the world as a well' 
grounded, thoroughly-trained musician. 

Following this conviction, the Institute offers, in 
addition to musical instruction by artists of authoritative 
achievement, an opportunity, in its Academic Courses, for 
its students to acquire a true conception of the history of 
the world in which they live, a study of the interrelation' 
ships of the allied arts, the principles of psychology, 
languages, diction, a course of reading of the great poets 
and writers of all ages, and a survey of the world's his- 
tory for its bearing on the development of the arts. 

For these courses it draws upon the Faculty of The 
University of Pennsylvania, whose professors in the Arts 
are teaching in The Curtis Institute of Music. 

The Institute offers, therefore, a distinctive academic 
course as forming a direct part of its musical instruction, 
so that a student may graduate from the Institute not only 
with a knowledge of the best in music but with a carefully 
taught cultural background. 

A Curtis Institute pupil leaves it, therefore, with 
something more than the acquisition of a technical musical 
knowledge. 



The Faculty of The Institute 

Another point of distinction of The Curtis Institute 
of Music is in the unusual quaHty of the men and women 
who comprise its faculty, of which there are over forty 
instructors. These include not only the artists of most 
distinguished achievement such as 

Madame Marcella Sembrich 
Mr. Josef Hofmann 
Mr. Leopold Stokowski 
Mr. Carl Flesch 
Madame Charles Cahier 
Mr. Carlos Salzedo 
Mr. Michael Press 

but in each department are found associated with them 
those artists whose standing in the world of music and 
whose capacities for teaching the art in which they con' 
spicuously excel are unquestioned. 

In nearly every instance, these artists are actually 
an active and distinguished part of the world of music 
of to-day. Thus their knowledge of music is constantly 
freshened by contact with the public in actual and con' 
stant personal performance. 



A J^ion-Commercial Institution 

A further note of distinction, and a most important 
one, is that The Curtis Institute of Music is an endowed 
institution, and is thus fortunately removed from commer' 
cial considerations. It is free to command to its support 
the most distinguished artists of capable attainments which 
the music and academic worlds afford, and it gives to the 
public the benefit of this impressive array of talent at 
tuition fees in which the commercial element does not enter. 



The Aim of The Institute 

The fortunate presence of this endowment makes it 
possible for The Curtis Institute of Music to realise its aim 
which is exactly the reverse of accepting and producing 
musical students in large numbers. It looks to the quality 
of its students rather than to the quantity. It confines 
its enrollment to a number which it can adequately and 
thoroughly instruct. It is discriminating in its acceptance 
of students, and is even more regardful of the manner in 
which its pupils are taught. It tries equally to serve the 
student who wishes to be a private performer, those who 
wish to play in public and those who have the intention 
to become teachers of distinction. It offers freely, there' 
fore, its distinctive features at the most moderate fees, so 
that its influence may be of the widest range, in order 
that it may make a distinct contribution to the musical 
life of America. 

To this policy every instructor in The Curtis Institute 
is committed. 



eight 




Pliotograph by Mishkin 

Madame Marcella Sembrich 
Instructor of the Voice at The Curtis Institute of Music 




Photograph by Mishkin 

Mr. Josef Hofmann 
Instructor of the Piano at The Curtis Institute of Music 



The Faculty 

of 
The Conservatory Department 

For the Term of October, 1924, to June, 1925 

Piano 
Josef Hofmann 
David Saperton, Assistant 
George F. Boyle Austin Coneiadi 

Berthe Bert Isabella Vengerova 

Voice 
Madame Marcella Sembrich 
Madame Charles Cahier Horatio Connell 

Perley Dunn Aldrich Mrs. Wood Stewart 

Violin 

Carl Flesch 
Michael Press Sacha Jacobinoff 

Frank Gittelson Emanuel Zetlin 

Orchestral Training 

Leopold Stokowski 

Michael Press 

Assisted by the Solo Players of 

The Philadelphia Orchestra 

Operatic Training 
Andreas Dippel 

Violoncello 
Horace Britt Michel Penha 



Harp 
Carlos Salzedo 

Ensemble 
Horace Britt Louis Svecenski 

Composition 
ROSARIO SCALERO 

7<lormal Classes 
Angela Diller 

Theory Classes 
George A. Wedge N. Lindsay Norden 

W. Beatrice Haines Else West Rulon 



The Faculty 

of 
The Preparatory Department 

For the Term of October, 1924, to June, 1925 

Piano 

Mrs. George F. Boyle Arthur E. Hice 

Esther Cinberg M. Leah Kirshner 

Clara Dunn Edith T. Lewis 

Ethel S. Drummond Hermione Montanye 

Dorothy D. Eason Marjorie Paddock 

IsADORE Freed Else West Rulon 

Ruth Shufro Strauss 

Classes in Musicianship 
Angela Diller Edith T. Lewis 

Ethel S. Drummond Else West Rulon 

W. Beatrice Haines Dorothy Weed 

Margaret Lea 

Violin 
Joel Belov Lotta Greenup 

Horace Brown Maurice Kaplan 

LiLLL\N Cinberg Alfred Seyden 

David Cohen 

Violoncello 
Alix Einert Brown 



eleven 



The Faculty 

of 
The Academic Department 

For the Term of October, 1924, to June, 1925 

Lawrence Adler Adviser 

English 
William Page Harbeson, B.S., Ll.B., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English Literature 
University of Pennsylvania 

Samuel Arthur King 
Bryn Mawr College 

French 

Jean B. Beck, Ph.D. 

Professor of Romanic Languages 

University of Pennsylvania 

Jean Frois Wittman, M.A. 

Graduate School 

Princeton University 

German 

Hermann J. Weigand, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of German 

University of Pennsylvania 



twelve 



Italian 

DOMENICO VlTTORINI, A.M., LiTT.D. 

Assistant Professor of Romanic Languages 
University of Pennsylvania 

History 

Richard H. Shryock, Ph.D. 

Instructor in EListory 

University of Pennsylvania 

Psychology 
Elton Mayo, A.M., M.D. 
University of Pennsylvania 

Musical History 

Jean B. Beck, Ph.D. 

Professor of Romanic Languages 

University of Pennsylvania 

Morrison C. Boyd, A.M., Mus.Bac. (Oxon.), F.A.G.O. 

Instructor in Music 
University of Pennsylvania 

Music Appreciation 
Lawrence Adler, A.M., A.B. 
The Curtis Institute of Music 



thirteen 



The Calendar 

For the Season of 
1925^1926 



Enrollment Conferences for Preparatory Department 

September 14-19 1925 
Entrance Examinations for Conservatory Department 

September 21-26 1925 

First Term Begins October 1 1925 

Second Term Begins February 1 1926 

Second Term Ends May 29 1926 

Commencement June 4 1926 

Holiday's 

Thanksgiving Thursday, November 26 1925 

Christmas Vacation December 22-January 4 1926 

Washington's Birthday February 22 1926 

Easter Vacation Wednesday before Easter 

to Thursday after Easter, 
inclusive, 1926 

All applications, whether in person or by mail, should 
be made to 

The Director 

The Curtis Institute of Music 

rittenhouse square 

philadelphia pennsylvanl\ 



fourteen 



The Conservatory Department 

The Curtis Institute of Music is divided into two 
departments, the Conservatory and the Preparatory. The 
Conservatory Department will accept students sufficiently 
advanced to meet its requirements, while the Preparatory 
Department will accept less advanced students and begin- 
ners. 

Piano 
Josef Hofmann 
David Saperton, Assistant 
Berthe Bert Austin Conradi 

George F. Boyle Isabella Vengerova 

A study of the average accompHshment of piano 
students tends to show a need for teaching the essential 
factors upon which piano playing as an art is based — 
namely, ear training, rhythmic training, aural and key- 
board harmony, sight reading, repertoire (technical as well 
as solo) and the elements of music. The Institute beHeves 
that only through a thorough knowledge of these funda- 
mentals can true musicianship as well as technical pro- 
ficiency be developed. For those planning to teach music, 
a familiarity with pedagogy and the elements of psychol- 
ogy, and practical experience in the use of teaching material 
is essential, in addition to the subjects mentioned above. 
The courses of the Institute, therefore, have been ar- 
ranged to give each student this fundamental training. 

Piano 

One hour lesson weekly. 



fifteen 



Musicianship 

Approximately six hours of instruction weekly. 

1. Ear Training. 

2. Aural and Keyboard Harmony, Counterpoint, 

Improvisation, Composition. 

3. Elements of Music, Analysis, Form and Aesthetics. 

4. Study of Repertoire — To insure correct principles 

for self'development and teaching through 
familiarity with a sufficient number of classic 
and modern compositions. 

5. Ensemble playing. 

6. Practical experience in teaching in one of the 

Preparatory Centers of the Institute for those 
who desire to receive the Teacher's Certificate. 
In addition to the musical instruction, the course in 
piano includes the study of Musical History, the Principles 
of Psychology and Philosophy, as well as two additional 
academic courses. A satisfactory paper on these elective 
subjects is required for graduation. 

Voice 
Madame Marcella Sembrich 
Perley Dunn Aldrich Horatio Connell 

Madame Charles Cahier Mrs. Wood Stewart 

Opera 

Andreas Dippel 

In general, vocalists do not have an opportunity of 
receiving adequate rhythmic training, ear training, and 
instruction in the fundamentals of aural and keyboard 
harmony or piano playing. Other elementary needs are 



sixteen 




Photograph by Goldensky 

Mr. 



Leopold Stokowski 



Conductor of The Philadelphia Orchestra 
Instructor of Orchestra Training at The Curtis 
Institute of Music 




Photograph by Kiibey -Rembrandt 

Mr. Carl Flesch 
Instructor of the Violin at The Curtis Institute of Music 



the study of diction, languages and concert repertoire. 
Students should also be familiar with church music, ora' 
torio or opera. 

The courses in singing have been planned to give the 
students this indispensable training as well as a comprc 
hensive cultural background. 

Vocal Instruction 

Two half 'hour lessons weekly. 

Musicianship 

Approximately six hours of instruction weekly. 

1. Rhythmic Training, Ear Training and Theory. 

2. Piano (if not previously studied) . 

3. Elements of Music, Analysis and Form. 

4. Ensemble Singing. 

5. Repertoire and Coaching. 

6. Languages, Study of Diction. 

7. Opera, including a thorough training in stage de' 

portment, Oratorio, or Church Music (according 
to the purpose for which the student is train- 
ing). 

Vocal students will be required to study the History 
of Music. They are also required to attend such lectures 
in the Academic Courses as the Director and instructors 
consider necessary. 

Oratorio and Repertoire 

The instruction in these subjects is based upon the 

historic development of the oratorio and of vocal reper- 

toire, and includes analysis, phrasing, rhythmic design and 

thorough understanding of accompaniments. In addition, 



seventeen 



students should become familiar with the poetic or religious 
message of the works studied. 

Opera 

The course is planned to familiarise the students not 
only with the music of the most important operas, but also 
with the dramatic action. 

The course will include the study of stage deport- 
ment, repertoire, and a thorough analysis of the operatic 
scores. 



eighteen 



Stringed Instruments 

For the Term of October, 1924, to June, 1925 

Violin 
C\RL FlESCH 

Michael Press Frank Gittelson 

Sacha Jacobinoff Emanuel Zetlin 

Viola 
Louis Svecenski 

Violoncello 
Horace Britt Michel Penha 

Harp 
Carlos Salzedo 

Ensemble 
Horace Britt Louis Svecenski 

Players of stringed instruments have many funda' 
mental needs besides their regular instrumental instruction. 
Ear training, rhythmic training, aural and keyboard har- 
mony, followed by counterpoint and composition, should 
be supplemented with ensemble and orchestra playing. 
A knowledge of the principal compositions for their 
respective instruments is essential to make them intelHgent 
musicians, as is also sufficient instruction on the piano to 
play accompaniments. 

Furthermore, those who enter the profession as 
teachers need instruction in pedagogy and the elements of 
psychology, as well as practical teaching experience. 

The following advanced courses are offered to the 
students of stringed instruments : 



nineteen 



Instrumental Instruction 
One hour lesson weekly. 

Musicianship 
Approximately six hours of instruction weekly. 

1. Ear Training. 

2. Aural and Keyboard Harmony, Counterpoint, 

Improvisation, Composition. 

3. Elements of Music, Analysis, Form and Aesthetics. 

4. Piano. 

5. Study of Repertoire — To insure correct principles 

of self'development and teaching through 
familiarity with a sufficient number of classic 
and modern compositions. 

6. Ensemble and Orchestra Playing. 

7. Practical experience in teaching in one of the 

Preparatory Centers of the Institute for those 
who desire to receive the Teacher's Certificate. 

In addition to the musical instruction, these courses 
also include the study of Musical History, the Principles 
of Psychology and Philosophy, as well as two additional 
academic courses. A satisfactory paper on these elective 
subjects is required for graduation. 

Ensemble 

The instruction is planned to develop the student's 
understanding and consequent playing of the master works 
of the classic, romantic and modern schools. 



twenty 



Orchestra Training 



Leopold Stokowski 

Michael Press 

Assisted b}' the solo players of 

The Philadelphia Orchestra 

There will be two orchestras attached to the Curtis 
Institute of Music: a Junior and a Senior Orchestra. 
When students are fitted they will be offered positions in 
The Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Instruction is offered in the playing of all orchestral 
instruments. 

Students will receive thorough training in rhythmic 
phrasing, orchestra technic, tone production and the devel- 
opment of detail. They will also be taught to discriminate 
between the style and the essential characteristics of the 
master works to be performed. 



For Teachers' Study 

Students of the Institute who are preparing for a 
Teacher's Certificate have the opportunity of teaching 
under expert supervision in one of The Curtis Institute 
preparatory centers. This not only gives them valuable 
practical experience in applying the theories of pedagogy, 
but also develops one of the essential factors of successful 
teaching — the ability to make personal and social contacts. 

History of Music 
Period / I. Development of the Church tonalities 
of the \ from the old Greek music system. 

Middle j ii_ Beginning of polyphonic music. 
^ \ III. The flowering of the true counterpoint. 



twenty-one 



I. The age of musical reforms. 

Modern ] "' ^^ P^^°^ °^ ^^^ classics. 

Period ) III- Modern Music (Romanticism, the growth 

of subjectiveness, the tendency toward 

descriptive music) . 

Recitals and Lectures 

Recitals and lectures will be given throughout the 
year by members of the faculty and special lecturers. At 
these recitals an intimate and informal atmosphere will be 
maintained. 

Recitals by the Conservatory Department students 
themselves will be held at stated times during the year. 



twentytwo 



Entrance Examinations 

All candidates for admission to the Conservatory De- 
partment will be expected to pass an entrance examination. 
These examinations will be held during the week of 
September 21-27, 1925. 

A fee of ten dollars, payable before the examination, 
will be required of all candidates. If the examination 
results in enrollment, the fee will be credited on the first 
tuition payment. 

Piano 

Candidates must be able to play satisfactorily from 
memory all major and minor scales and arpeggios; selected 
studies from C^erny, Opus 740; Bach Three- Part Inven- 
tions; a movement of a Beethoven Sonata, or a Com- 
position of equal difficulty. 

Voice 

Any student will be accepted who has a good voice, a 
correct ear and a natural sense of rhythm. 

Violin 

Candidates must be able to play satisfactorily all 
major and minor scales, and arpeggios in three and four 
octaves. They should also have sufficient training in 
double stop playing, and the ability to play the Kreut2ier 
Exercises and one of the following concertos from mem- 
ory: Spohr No. 2, De Beriot No. 2, Kreut^er No. 19, 
Viotti No. 22, Rode No. 7, Theme and Variations by 
J. Tartini, or a composition of equal difficulty. 



twentythree 



Violoncello 

Candidates must be able to play satisfactorily from 
memory all major and minor scales, arpeggios, and a con' 
certo by Golterman, Romberger, Klengel, or some other 
composition of equal difficulty. 

Musicianship 

All students will be examined in general musicianship 
(Ear Training, Theory, Rhythmic Training) and will be 
graded according to their previous instruction. 

These are minimum requirements. Students offering 
more advanced work will be given full credit and be 
rated according to their proficiency. 

Certificates and Diplomas 
Conservatory Department 

A Certificate will be granted to students who have 
satisfactorily completed the full courses of study in their 
respective branches. No time limit can be set for the 
completion of any course as the time needed is dependent 
upon the student's individual effort and ability, but, in 
general, the full course may be completed in three or four 
years. 

A Diploma is given to students who have received 
the Certificate of Graduation and who have completed two 
years of post'graduate work. 

A Teacher's Certificate will be given to those students 
who have successfully completed the regular course in the 
Conservatory Department and additional work in practical 
and theoretical pedagogy. 



twentyfour 




L. e 



The Academic Department 

Lawrence Adler Adviser 

The cultural development of music students should 
aim to give them an understanding and appreciation of the 
interrelationship of the various arts and sciences. Chief 
among these contributions to man's spiritual life are the 
fine arts, literature, science, philosophy, and psychological 
research. 

The aim of the Academic Courses of the Institute 
is to acquaint the students with the fundamental unity 
underlying the various art forms and related sciences, in 
order to develop the students' sense of responsibility tO' 
ward art and life, and to give them a higher conception of 
personal and professional ethics. 

Students are required to study at least two academic 
subjects each term and attend lectures assigned to them. 

A paper based on these elective subjects is required 
for graduation. 

The Academic Courses and their instructors are as 
follows : 

English 

William Page Harbeson, B.S., Ll.B., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English Literature 

University of Pennsylvania 

L A course for students who have finished high school. 

IL An elementary course in readings from the epics and 

modern poetry. 

Samuel Arthur King 
Bryn Mawr College 
L A course in English Diction having for its purpose 
a better pronunciation of the language. 



twentyjive 






French 

Jean B. Beck, P.D. 

Professor of Romanic Languages 

University of Pennsylvania 

Jean Frois Wittman, M.A. 
Graduate School 
Princeton University 
I. French Literature : By Doctor Beck. 

An advanced course with a good understanding of 
French. 
IL Intermediate French: By Mr. Wittman. 

A course in French Grammar, reading and conversa' 
tion. 
in. Elementary French : By Mr. Wittman. 

A conversational course. 
IV. Advanced French Diction: By Doctor Beck. 
Elementary French Diction : By Mr. Wittman. 
A course for vocal students. 

German 

Herman J. Weigand, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of German 

University of Pennsylvania 

I. Diction, Grammar, Conversation and Reading. 

For beginners and students of limited experience in 
German study. 

Italian 

DOMENICO VlTTORINI, A.M., LiTT.D. 

Assistant Professor of Romanic Languages 
University of Pennsylvania 
I. Diction, Grammar, Conversation and Reading. 
For beginners and students of limited ItaHan study. 



twentysix 



History 

Richard H. Shryock, Ph.D. 
Instructor in History- 
University of Pennsylvania 

I. Survey of World History. 

A condensed course of the great events in world 
history. 

Psychology 

Elton Mayo, A.M., M.D. 
University of Pennsylvania 

I. Psychology and Mental Hygiene. 

A course meeting the special needs of musical students. 

Musical History 

Jean B. Beck, Ph.D. 

Professor of Romanic Languages 

University of Pennsylvania 

Morrison C. Boyd, A.M., Mus.Bac. (Oxon.), F.A.G.O. 
Instructor in Music 
University of Pennsylvania 
I. The Early Musical History: By DOCTOR Beck. 
II. The Modern Period: By Mr. Boyd. 

Music Appreciation 

Lawrence Adler, A.M., A.B. 
The Curtis Institute of Music 
I. An advanced course for students of musical back- 
ground. 



twenty'seven 



A Comparative Arts Series 

Each year a Course of Talks in the Comparative 
Arts will be given in the Academic Department. 

This course traces, along broad lines, the develop- 
ment of artistic civiHzation from the time of the Ancient 
Greeks to the Modern Period, revealing the intimate 
relationship and correlative value of all the Arts. 

The course considers the contribution to the cultural 
development of the human race made by music, the 
plastic arts and literature. 

The general significance of such important move- 
ments as the Renaissance and the Reformation are pre- 
sented, as well as the early Hturgy of the Roman CathoHc 
Church and the Songs and Lays of the Troubadours. 

Classicism and Romanticism are treated from the 
aspect of the varied development which the Fine Arts 
underwent on the Continent and in England. 

The works of Beethoven and Michael Angelo and 
the influence of Goethe and Schiller on such composers 
as Beethoven and Brahms are discussed in special com- 
parative lectures. 

The relation of Art to the great fundamental cur- 
rents of ethical thinking is also considered. 

The lectures now being given during the Season of 
1924-1925 include, among other speakers: 

Professor Felix Adler 

Founder of the Ethical Culture Society, New York City 

Professor Jean B. Beck 

Department of Romance Languages, University of 

Pennsylvania 



twentyeight 



Professor Morrison C. Boyd 
Department of Music, University of Pennsylvania 

Professor George D. Hadzsits 
Department of Latin, University of Pennsylvania 

Mr. Leo Katz 
New York City 

Mr. Frederic Lamond 
Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York 

Mr. Alfred Martin 
Ethical Culture Society, New York 

Professor Frank Jewett Mather 
Director of Fine Arts, Princeton University 

Mr. Rosario Scalero 
Department of Composition, The Curtis Institute of Music 

Professor F. E. Schelling 
Department of English, University of Pennsylvania 

Professor J. Duncan Spaeth 
Department of English, Princeton University 

Professor Domenico Vittorini 

Department of Romance Languages, University of 

Pennsylvania 

Professor Herman J. Weigand 

Associate Professor of German, University of 

Pennsylvania 

Mr. PiAL S. White 
Department of English, Yale University 



twentynine 



The Preparatory Department 

Beginners and less advanced students who are sin- 
cerely interested in their work and who possess natural 
aptitude for music are eligible for admission to the Prepar- 
atory Department. These requirements are made to pre- 
vent useless expenditure of time and money on the part of 
the pupil which so often occurs when students study music 
without due consideration. 

After a personal conference with the Director or the 
Executive Secretary, candidates for this Department will 
be placed in the courses for which their previous training 
has fitted them. Conferences udll be held during the week 
of September 14-19. 

The courses of the Preparatory Department are 
planned to prepare the students, including beginners, for 
the advanced and master classes of the Institute. Complete 
co-ordination between the instrumental and the theoretical 
instruction will be maintained. 

Piano 

Mrs. George F. Boyle Arthur E. Hice 

Esther CiNBERG M. Leah Kirshner 

Clara Dunn Edith T. Lewis 

Ethel S. Drummond Hermione Montanye 

Dorothy D. Eason Marjorie Paddock 

IsADORE Freed Elsie West Rulon 
Ruth Shufro Strauss 

Classes in Musicianship 

Angela Diller Margaret Lea 

Ethel S. Drummond Edith T. Lewis 

W. Beatrice Haines Elsie West Rulon 

Dorothy Weed 



thirty 





Violin 




Joel Belov David Cohen 
Horace Brown Lotta Greenup 
Lillian Cinberg Maurice Kaplan 
Alfred Seyden 






Violoncello 




Alix Einert Brown 






Piano 




Two half 'hour lessons weekly. 






Musicianship 




Approximately two hours of instruction weekly. 
Elements of Music, Rhythmic Training, Ear Training, 
Theory, Ensemble, Sight Reading, Class Discussions. 




Violin 




Two half 'hour lessons weekly. 






Musicianship 




Approximately 
Elements of Music, 
Theory, Ensemble, 
Class Discussions. 


two hours of instruction 

Rhythmic Training, Ear 

Sight Reading, Orchestra 

Viola 


weekly. 

Training, 

Practice, 


Two half 'hour lessons weekly. 




Approximately 
Elements of Music, 
Theory, Ensemble, 
Class Discussions. 


Musicianship 

two hours of instruction 

Rhythmic Training, Ear 

Sight Reading, Orchestra 


weekly. 

Training, 

Practice, 



ihirtyone 



Violoncello 
Two half 'hour lessons weekly. 

Musicianship 
Approximately two hours of instruction weekly. 
Elements of Music, Rhythmic Training, Ear Training, 
Theory, Ensemble, Sight Reading, Orchestra Practice, 
Class Discussions. 

Ensemble 
Duet Playing, Chamber Music Playing, Chorus 
Singing. 

Orchestra 
Technic of Orchestra Playing, Development of Ear, 
Phrasing, Dynamics, Study of Orchestra Repertoire. 

Students must show by their progress and general 
musicianship that they are eligible to enter the Conserva- 
tory Department of the Institute. To this end, they are 
required to pass the entrance examinations of the Con- 
servatory Department. 

Students graduating from the Preparatory Depart- 
ment will receive a Certificate of Graduation from the 
Department. 

The time required to complete the courses of the 
Preparatory Department depends entirely upon the indi- 
vidual effort and abiHty of the student. 



thirtytwo 




Photograph by Kesseler 

Madame Charles Cahier 
Instructor of the Voice at The Curtis Institute of Music 




Photograph by Gtitehunst 



Mr. Michael Press 

Instructor of the Violin and of Orchestra Training 

at The Curtis Institute of Music 



special Courses 



A limited number of special students in the vocal 
and instrumental courses will be admitted each year. 
These students, enrolling for special subjects only, are 
charged the studio rate of the teacher to whom they are 
assigned. 

Teachers' Normal Courses — instrumental as well as 
theoretical — will be given for students and teachers not 
connected with the Institute. 

Parents and patrons of music are invited to attend 
lectures on the Appreciation of Music and the Elements 
of Music. Terms may be obtained upon application to 
the Executive Secretary. 



thirtythree 



General Information 

The Curtis Institute has no dormitories, and does not 
assume responsibiHty for the housing of its students. It 
will, upon request, refer an applicant to organizations 
specially equipped for the recommendation of residential 
quarters. 

The Studios throughout the Institute are equipped 
with Steinway pianos, with more than 45 instruments in 
constant use. 

To insure progress satisfactory to the Institute, the 
parents, and the pupils themselves, the Institute makes 
certain reasonable demands of its students. Regular and 
punctual class attendance, careful preparation of lessons, 
attendance at demonstration recitals by students and fac 
ulty, and co'Operation with the requirements of the Insti' 
tute, will be expected at all times. 

Students enroUing in either department will be 
assigned to teachers by the Director according to the 
development and needs of the students. Requests for 
assignment to specified teachers will be given careful con' 
sideration, but the Director reserves the right to make 
such assignments as seem in his judgment to be for the 
best interests of the students. 

In case of absence for any cause whatsoever, notice 
should be sent or given immediately to the Secretary's 
office. 

All courses at the Institute will be arranged to insure 
the students the maximum time for practice. 

Students may be excused from any of the courses in 
either Department upon presenting satisfactory proof of 
previous study. 



thirtyfour 



Instrumental instruction will be given individually; 
theoretical and academic courses in classes. 

A report of the student's attendance and progress 
will be presented at the end of each school term. 

Students in the Conservatory Department will be 
expected to pass an examination in their principal studies 
at the end of each school term. 

Two examinations a term will be given to students 
in the Preparatory Department. 

Students faiHng to pass a satisfactory examination in 
a subject will be permitted to repeat the subject. 

Students whose work is not satisfactory, either through 
lack of effort or ability, cannot be continued as students 
of the Institute. 



thirtyfive 





Prices of Tuition 






As The Curtis Institute of Music is endowed 
and free from all commercial considerations, its 
tuition fees have been fixed at moderate sums. 






Tuition, payable strictly in advance, is due in two 
installments — the first on October 1st, the second on 
February 1st. 

Students will be enrolled only for the entire year. 

Students admitted after the opening of the school 
term will be charged for the time during which they are 
students at the Institute. 

No refund will be made for students leaving before 
the expiration of the school year. Exceptional cases will 
receive the consideration of the Director. 

No deduction will be made for loss of lessons, except 
in case of protracted illness of more than five weeks. In 
this ra.se, a rebate of one-half the fee for the time lost will 
be credited on the next term's tuition, if the student returns 
to the Institute within the current year. 

Tuition covers instruction in all courses of study 
required by the various departments, and attendance at all 
lectures and concerts given at the Institute. 

Conservatory Department 
Complete Courses 

Total First Term Second Terra 
Per Annum Payment Payment 

Piano $300 $175 $125 

Stringed Instruments 300 175 125 

Voice 350 200 150 

Orchestra instruments — terms upon request. 





thirtysix 







Drawing by Ruyl 



The Preparatory Department Building 
of The Curtis Institute of Music 



vVV"^ 






**si ^ i^« ii ♦ ^ ^ f f- w , f 






J ■ 









-jr 










C-'* 










??^ 



:•-#* 



■■*-P~ 






Drazving by Ruyl 



The Entrance Hall in the 
Preparatory Department Building 



special Courses 



First Second 

Total Term Term 

Per Annum Payment Payment 

Theory $100 $60 $40 

Teachers' Normal Course 100 60 40 

Additional Courses — Terms upon request 



Preparatory Department 
Complete Courses 



First Second 

Total Term Term 

Per Annum Payment Payment 

Piano $175 $100 $75 

Stringed Instruments 175 100 75 



thirtyseven 



Free Scholarships 

One scholarship, entithng the student to free tuition, 
will be given in each branch of study offered by the 
Institute. Tliese scholarships will be awarded to students 
of exceptional talent and who are in need of assistance. 

There are also six special free scholarships: 

The Olga Samaroff Scholarship for the Piano. 

The Mr. and Mrs. John F. Braun Scholarship for 
Composition. 

The Mary S. Collins Scholarship for Viola. 

The Mr. and Mrs. William Curtis Bok Scholarship 
for Violin or Piano. 

The Eleanor Pillsbury Pennell Scholarship for 
the Voice. 

The Cyrus Libbey Curtis Scholarship for the 
Trombone. 



thirtyeight 



As The Curtis Institute of Music's aim is for quality 
and not quantity, the number of students is limited in 
order that careful individual instruction may be given to 
each pupil. For this reason, early enrollment is necessary, 
in order to avoid disappointment. 



thirtynine 



Biddle-Paret Press 
Philadelphia 



forty 



'■iU. 



4 







i^^;:-:T*SS'l-":rri 









^2^' sJ-C\V^\>i , ' Vy M 



IkPl^fWSIfr 













Drawing by Ruyl 



The Executive Department Building 
of The Curtis Institute of Music 



A national institution ojfering a 

thorough musical education h-y the 

foremost artists of distinguished 

accomplishment 



fflU 


P^IIJ 


ioiws^'JB^ 


»r. -^i* ■-ti?!?; 


^^^■s 


pMHi 



vm. 




sje*i 






#:-^;-.-^ 

-^^>' :•.. 















V*. < V > • 



*4 ^ aT/ 



-'^^7.^ 















r^v^ 















t^^. 






->. ^. 






:: -Cl .4-7 '- 



I 






:*>f«.- 






I .4. 









--r 






./ 










■\br